Mustang A-2 Flight Jacket

Regular price $560.00

We are proud to offer a limited edition re-issue of an original variant of the A-2 Air Army Force pilot's jacket introduced as official uniform wear in 1931 and permitted to be made of goatskin even though the original specifications called for horsehide with goatskin as an alternative. We offer this recreation of the goatskin alternative because we believe that both leathers provide a good historical perspective on this iconic jacket. Our jacket is unique because it is made of veg tanned goatskin as were the originals that were made during the 1930’s and 40’s. We then use our specially developed process to gently age the leather to give it the look and patina of hundreds of hours of flight time in the cockpit as it would have been used before and during World War 2.

Features include side and top entry pockets with snap close flap, knit cuffs and waistband, side entry pockets were a sometime custom feature added by the pilots themselves for convenience. Proudly made in the USA.

• Vegetable tanned goatskin leather
• Silky lining
• Snap down collar
• Front zipper under wind flap
• Two front flap snap pockets
• Side entry pockets
• Two interior pockets
• Knit cuffs and waistband
• This is a regular fit jacket
• Available in brown
• Proudly made in the USA.

The Type A-2 flying jacket was officially standardized by the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1927, as the successor to the Type A-1 flying jacket. The military specification number for Type A-2 is 94-3040, Drawing Number 31-1415, but spec. labels found in the jackets themselves show this to be 30-1415.

The A-2 was traditionally awarded to an Army Air Forces officer upon completion of basic flight training, and always before graduating to advanced training. The informal standard system of distribution was airmen lining up in front of boxes containing jackets of various sizes and handed out by the base Quartermaster.

The flight jacket became a treasured item to all airmen, and was worn with as much pride as their wings. During their service, crews often added and removed squadron patches, rank marks, mission markings and occasionally painted artwork depicting the type of aircraft they flew, or the Nose Art painted on their aircraft.


You may also like