Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket

Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
Red Raiders A-2 Flight Jacket
$1,200.00 - $1,300.00
SKU: Red Raiders A-2 #: Z21T010
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We are proud to offer our Limited Edition hand painted 40th Anniversary "Red Raiders" A-2 Jacket. This Limited Edition A-2 is a replica of the jacket worn by the pilot of the Consolidated B-24 Liberator bearing the name "Red Raiders". The felt appliqué embroidered chest patches are of the 2nd Bombardment Squadron, which was assigned to the 22nd Bombardment Group.

Crafted from our durable horsehide leather it's authentic details include snap down collar with "Hook and Eye" closure, two front flap snap closure pockets with an interior chest pocket for modern function and convenience. The russet cotton poplin lining a features a silk screened and embroidered lining. The jacket back has been carefully hand painted, each painting unique, making every jacket a one of a kind. Proudly made in the USA.

 

 

Throughout 1941 the 22d BG trained extensively, increasing in intensity in November 1941. It was so combat ready that 16 hours after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, the 44 planes of the 22d BG headed for the West Coast and on to the South West Pacific.

On 5 April 1942, the 22d BG took off from Garbutt Field for its first combat action, an attack on Rabau in New Britain (North of New Guinea). In this attack on the Japanese Naval Base, the Group sunk a transport ship but lost one aircraft.

Meanwhile, four B-26s, including two from the 18th Reconnaissance Squadron, left behind at Hawaii, saw action on 4 June 1942 as part of the air attack in the Battle of Midway, and were the first Army aircraft to make a torpedo attack. Piloted by 1st Lieutenant Herbert C. Mayes and 1st Lieutenant James P. Muri, they  focusing torpedo and strafing action on the Japanese Naval Invasion Force aircraft carrier.  Lt Muri's plane, badly damaged with over 500 bullet and shrapnel holes, crash landed.

In 1944, the group converted to heavy four engined B-24 Liberator bombers, and on 11 February 1944 the 22d Bomb Group was redesignated 22 Bomb Group.  The 22d bombed Japanese airfields, shipping, and oil installations in Borneo, Ceram, and Halmahera, and began raiding the southern Philippines in September 1944 to neutralize Japanese bases in preparation for the invasion of Leyte.  

After the war, the 22 Bomb Group was assigned B-29 Superfortress bombers, and in May 1948, moved to the United States to serve Strategic Air Command (SAC).

During the Korean War, the 22 Bomb Group had amassed fifty-seven missions against the enemy, attacking bridges, factories, industrial targets, troop concentrations, airfields, marshalling yards, communications centers, and port facilities during thier 335 sorties with only fourteen aborts and releasing over 6,500 tons of bombs.