A Chemtrail Christmas

A few days before Christmas, on the morning of December 20th 1978,  a lone Cessna was making its way across the Pacific Ocean.  Piloted by Jay Prochnow, a retired US Navy pilot, it was Initially planned as a four stage, two ship, transoceanic delivery of two Cessna 188s, from the United States, to Australia.  Unfortunately the second Cessna crashed shortly after take off from Pago Pago.  Jay had elected to continue to journey across the Pacific on his own.  
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Sometime after his departure from Pago Page, the ADF on board began to lead him off course en route to Norfolk Island.  When arriving in what he thought was the Norfolk area, Jay could not get a visual on the island.  Advising Auckland ATC of his situation, fuel at this time was not an immediate issue so Jay continued his search.  After some positional checks, he made the frightening realization that his ADF had led him far off course.  Now lost over the Pacific Ocean, in a single engine Cessna, no sight of land, Jay contacted Auckland ATC, and declared an emergency.
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No other aircraft were in the area that could provide assistance, except for a Air New Zealand DC-10  high above, that was flying from Fiji to Aukland New Zealand,  crewed by Capt Gordon Vette, First Officer Arthur Dovey, and Flight Engineer Gordon Brooks.  
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Once becoming aware of the situation, Capt Vette knew full well that if assistance was not provided to that lost aircraft, then the pilot will surly run out of fuel, and be forced to ditch the aircraft in the middle of the Pacific.  A water landing may be very  well survivable, but being lost at sea, less so.  
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The crew of Flight 308 was able to raise Jay on the  HF radio, and began to work on some numbers to try and locate the Cessna before the sun sets.  Luckily Capt Vette was a licensed navigator, and even more fortuitously, a passenger, Malcolm Forsyth, also a navigator; had volunteered to help. 
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With crew on both sides trying to figure out some creative navigational solutions, it was decided to attempt to estimate the lost Cessna's position relative to the Air New Zealand's by comparing their relative headings when facing the sun and solar angles of elevation, so both aircraft turned towards the setting sun and noted the difference in heading.  The result was four degrees. After making an allowance for the different cruising altitudes of the aircraft, the difference in sunset times between the aircraft and Norfolk Island. This data allowed the crew to calculate that the Cessna was now southwest of Flight 308 by approximatly 400 nautical miles. 
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So Flight 308 turning in that direction.  25 minutes later, Capt Vette was able to contact the Cessna on the VHF radio, which now put the two aircraft in a much smaller geographical radius.   
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At this time, although not much fuel of their own after deviating to look for the lost Cessna, Capt Vette decided to activate the fuel/chemtrail dump switch, in hopes of leaving a massive chemtrail across the sky. and hopefully help in getting the lost Cessna found.  The switch was hit, and over 24, 000 gallons of chemtrail vapour poured out a colossal trail across the sky.  
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Sadly, Jay was not able to see the chemtrail due to atmospheric conditions, and the situation was now looking grim.  Darkness was approaching.  
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The aircraft were in the same vicinity, but still no visual contact between the two for an exact position. Capt Vette asked all his passengers to look out their windows  in hopes any of them could catch a glimpse of the Cessna below, and even invited small groups to come to the cockpit to help in the forward scan.  
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As the light conditions became darker, Jay considered ditching his aircraft into the waters below before all light was lost, but Capt Vette convinced him to continue . They then attempted to use a technique known as "aural boxing" ; this took over an hour to execute, but once it was completed, they had a much better approximation of Jay’s position.
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Capt Vette lit up all the DC-10 s lights so that perhaps Jay could see them from below.
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Jay did see the light, but it was not of the DC-10 above, it was the lights of an oil rig they were able to identify as Penrod, which was being towed from New Zealand to Singapore This gave the Cessna’s exact position, and were the same as the estimates of the crew of the DC-10. 
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All thanks to the crew of Flight 308, Auckland ATC, and not deciding to ditch his aircraft, Jay Prochnow touched down on Norfolk Island on December 21st, with little more than vapour in his full tanks after being in the air alone and over ocean waters for twenty-three hours and five minutes.
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